Getting What You Need

Getting What You Need

The regressions I do are guided, a little by me, but mostly from those beings who are dedicated to the highest good of the client and the highest good of all.

The guidance comes to the clients through their imagination in the form of words, thoughts, ideas, images, feelings or impressions, which is commonly called “intuition.” My only promise for a regression is that each client will get what he or she needs. Occasionally, what some clients receive is very different to what they expected.

During one recent week, I had two clients who did not get what they expected from their regressions. Their names are Lance and Ruth. Although their regressions were very different, the message each received was much the same.

After many years working happily as a tradesman, Lance, 50, was keen to move into a different state to live a simple life in nature. He planned to build a small structure on property near a close friend where he could fish and grow food.

He had waited months to see me and, in the meantime, his pressing issues had resolved. He had left the relationship which concerned him and felt much happier as a consequence. Still, he wanted to experience a past life and a life between lives regression.

Lance had an unusual quality, he had a powerful, constant love for God. During the regression, whenever he quietly focussed on this love, tears of joy streamed down his face. He clearly remembered having these feelings at age four and they had been with him ever since.

I was in a place [church] where everyone was honouring God but I could see that they were not honouring that and didn’t know what they were doing. Their love for God was not manifesting in a genuine way. Always, that has been a deep grief for me. It has caused me to shut down on so many levels because there is no place for that love. It makes me so lonely.

I suggested Lance access a past life, but the only image that came was one he’d seen before.

I see a village in a clearing with six huts made of straw. A group of families live there who have a deep loving connection between them all. I sense a strong contrast with my current life family. A deep overwhelming love for God was easy there in that past life. We knew each other and everything was easy. There was harmony.

Lance could not elaborate on this image. His strongest impression was the feeling of connection between these people. I could see he was experiencing it deeply. Eventually, he explained that the feeling between the members of the group is the same feeling he has of loving God.

I deepened Lance’s trance but nothing more was coming to him so I decided to ask the questions he’d prepared for the session, suggesting he respond with the first thought, idea, image or impression that came to his mind.

Lance did this very well, receiving answers to all his questions. But he felt somewhat dissatisfied. “I already knew these answers,” he said.

Ruth was similar to Lance in that she had waited several months for her appointment and had resolved her situation since.

When I made the appointment, I was traumatised. I’d met this guy and didn’t know what to do.

Although she enjoyed spending time with this man, he had many health problems. After putting up with a demanding ex-husband and bringing up three children alone, she did not want to sign up to caring for an ill man. After thinking it through carefully, she’d decided she could enjoy his company as a friend without taking on any responsibility for his health.

Still, she was expecting to experience a past life and life between lives regression.

Ruth has travelled much since her children reached adulthood and a lot of it has been alone.

I have felt guidance. At one stage I flew on my own to a South American city knowing no one or what I would do when I got there. I would not let the any fear in. Travelling I have had these memories of past lives come back. I can sit alone on the bus and get the feelings.

Ruth recalled an example of her connection to her past lives.

In the Copan ruins in Central America. I felt something as soon as I walked in the door. I wanted to lie down on the ground. We were waiting for the guide. In that ancient time, women were killed to be with their dead husbands. After the tour, I sat with my back against the ruins. I realised that, in that past life, I and others were taught how to leave our bodies and return before we died. These ancient people actually believed that the life on Earth was of second importance to their spiritual life. The reason I felt this urge to lie of the ground came back to me. In the past life, I had decided to be buried alive so I could leave my body when I wanted. Leaning back on the ruins, I felt great joy in knowing that we, as those ancient people, knew about our spiritual life.

Ruth had remembered many of her past lives, but none were forthcoming during the regression. I decided to do the same thing I had done with Lance and ask the questions she had prepared. She received answers, but nothing much that was new to her. However, one answer was telling after I asked what her purpose was this life.

To have faith in myself.

Her guides laughed when she wondered about already knowing what she was receiving.

Lance and Ruth received the same message. Trust yourself. They had resolved their problems and were very capable of continuing to do so. They had looked for validation outside of themselves, thus coming to see me, but they didn’t need to do that anymore. They had the answers already, within. They just had to ask and then trust, knowing the answers are there and everything that is happening is doing so for a reason.

I cancelled their second regressions. They knew, and I knew, it wasn’t needed. Although they didn’t get the experience they expected, they were both happy. They each left with renewed faith in themselves and in their intuition, knowing that they had received exactly what they needed.

Discovering the Spirit World with Michael Newton

Discovering the Spirit World with Michael Newton

Michael Newton

Humans have known about the existence of spirits and the spirit world for tens of thousands of years of human existence, if not longer. Each tribe or culture has created their own interpretation of non-physical worlds from which our material Earth sprung.

These spiritual beliefs form the foundation of cultures. For example, the indigenous people of Australia have ancestral stories that came from the Dreamtime, the time when Ancestors created life and formations of the lands. The art, stories, ceremonies and song, passed down the generations, guide their survival physically, emotionally and spiritually.

In Western culture, the Bible formed the foundation of beliefs in an afterlife. Then came the renaissance, which eventually challenged the biblical ideas of heaven and hell, replacing them, to various degrees, with materialistic interpretations.

However, the evolution of Western culture has not stopped. It continues. In the last century, New Age beliefs have expanded from individuals becoming aware of non-physical worlds during Near Death Experiences, After Death communication, remembering past lives and other incidents that have no satisfactory scientific explanation. Some people write books about non-physical phenomena and readers have a growing body of literature to explore.

I am one of those who had an eye opening experience many years ago, but I am not alone. Michael Newton also described a similar experience well before I stumbled upon a client unexpectedly accessing a past life. I described this experience in my book, Other Lives, Other Realms. Hypnosis practitioners are particularly at risk of discovering the potential existence of other lives and realms.

Recently I came upon a link to Michael recounting this experience provided by the Michael Newton Institute in its quarterly online magazine, Stories of the Afterlife. You can subscribe to the magazine here.  And the link to watch Michael is here. Both links are worthwhile and enlightening.

The Impact of Very Strict Fathers

The Impact of Very Strict Fathers

A few months ago, I wrote about absent fathers, Part 1 and Part 2. I was surprised at the comments I received, some by email. Some readers drew strength from the stories in those blogs.

No doubt absent fathers strongly affect their sons and daughters. These children yearn for the attention of a caring dad.

Strict fathers also affect their children, but in a different way. These children soon learn to fear their fathers and try to avoid them. As they approach adulthood, they just want to escape to find safety and freedom.

 This was the case with Lily. Lily’s father emigrated from a country in Asia which was suffering significant turmoil at the time. Asian dads tend to be strict anyway, but we learned during the regression that most of his hardness came from a recent difficult past life. Lily had no memory of him ever being affectionate. In fact, she felt very afraid of him.

The only way dad knew how to discipline us was through verbal threats. I remember him telling me “If you say that again I will cut out your tongue.” Once I went to the store and talked to a boy. He saw me and said,” If you do that again I will break your legs so you cannot walk.”

Lily had a number of physical conditions that her doctors told her were from stress. She had suffered depression, but her main concern was her skin. Since she was a child, she had abrasions on her body, mainly on her arms and legs. They were not there at birth and when they did appear, they would come and go in different spots. She came for a regression hoping to gain some insight into this problem.

At the beginning of the regression, Lily lives a past life as a woman. She and her husband live together in a primitive cabin. Their relationship is loving.

I am at the window of the kitchen, seeing a man outside. It seems like I know him. I get a friendly feeling.  He is waving. I am not afraid. It actually makes me want to smile. I am married to him. We have been together for a good while. I feel happy and peaceful.

 I keep seeing things on the wall like pots, spatulars and measuring cups. I cook for the family. I have a sense of of connection and peace.

I make sure she anchors these positive feelings of being peaceful, happy and safe so she can access them whenever she wants.

Next she finds herself in a barren place surrounded by huge volcanos. She feels unsafe and scared. I suspect this represents her fear as a child. I ask for help and her guide appears.

The guide has light skin and light sky-blue eyes. She is wearing a robe with a hood over her head.I feel she is very friendly as she holds out her hand. Her name is Angela.

Angela, the guide, takes Lily her back to the cabin, suggesting she access the comforting feelings of being in the cabin whenever she feels afraid.

Soon she is back with the volcanos. She becomes aware of the volcanos being like her father. I wonder out loud how her father really felt about her.

My guide just reminded me of a dream I had of my dad. It was after he passed away. He came to me and was actually holding me. I was sobbing and crying. I’d never felt like that before.

I ask about herself as a girl, suggesting she find out what her younger self needs.

I see myself as a young girl with pigtails, of maybe three years old. I am getting down to her level so I can see her eye to eye. I see fear in her eyes.

I mention how brave this little girl has been.

For some reason, I just picked her up and flew off. She is enjoying flying. I am showing her that the world is bigger and not as scary as it seems. I am actually taking her to the Godfathers Pizza Place. Dad used to look after me when I was sick and bring me my medicine. He was the one who always picked me up when I was ill at school. I had stomach problems. Then he would take me somewhere to eat like McDonalds or the Godfather’s Pizza Place. We are there with him now. Those are good memories.

Lily and I laugh, thinking about eating fast food when ill.

It didn’t matter. It helped. He was a bit softer during those times. I enjoyed being with him then.

Angela now takes Lily to another scene.

I am at my wedding and dad is walking me down the aisle. I am showing my little girl how happy and proud he is. (Lily laughs). He raises his hand so seriously, saying “I do” when the minister asks who gives me away.

Another memory comes. At 27, I had a heart operation. As I was wheeled into the theatre, he touched my toe affectionally and held onto it. (Laughing.) He didn’t know what else to do.

I received an award. Only four girls in the whole school were chosen. He had a bouquet of roses for me. Since he died, I remember having a lot of dreams of him showing me affection.

Lily begins to cry a little. I know she was afraid to cry as a child. I suggest she let herself soften and cry because she doesn’t want to be like her dad—afraid to be vulnerable. After crying a little more she speaks.

Angela is smiling.

We ask Angela about the abrasions on Lily’s arms.

Angela is taking me to the ocean, and I see a sunset. The sun is red orange. The waves are gentle, and the sand is warm. I feel that she tells me that the sea, sand and sun would help with my skin.

Now Angela is rubbing my arms in a very soothing way and putting primrose oil on them. I have been using it before, but I didn’t think it was working. She tells me she guided me to it, and it takes time to work. I need to trust it will help.

Our skin is what separates us from others and the rest of the world. Skin problems are about separation, either wanting to be separated or not wanting to be. Lily’s abrasions appear on the outside of her arms and legs, never on the inside. From that I deduce she intends to push someone away rather than bring them close. She wants separation from her father’s fierce threats. Even though he had died a decade ago, she was still carrying the fear her younger self felt.

From the regression, Lily receives what she needed. Her guide, Angela, took a her through a beautiful healing process which showed her adult self and child self that, in spite of his harsh discipline, her father loved her.

Feeling Disturbed?

Feeling Disturbed?

Have you ever noticed that sometimes something you see, hear about or read disturbs you and stays in you mind? There is a reason for this and it is worth exploring its source in order to gain a deeper self-understanding and peace.

This blog is accessed via a link. It is one I have written as a guest blog for my colleague, Lisbeth Lysdale.

NOTE: the english translation is below the Danish script.

Click here to read more.

 

 

Absent Fathers (Part 2)

Absent Fathers (Part 2)

In part 1 of this topic, I suggested that a father not being fully present for a child is part of their souls’ plan. Children develop strategies to cope with the emotional absence of their father and, as a consequence, the soul learns and grows. We look at another two examples of father absence.

Christian

Christian was a perfectionist. Although this sometimes suited his career as a specialist engineer, it also contributed to his general feelings of dissatisfaction. He tended to be self-critical, frustrated with his work colleagues and annoyed with his boss who failed to acknowledge his efforts at work.

The source of his perfectionism was his childhood relationship with his father. His father, an excellent provider, believed his only job as a husband and father was to bring in the money, mow the lawn occasionally and take out the garbage. Christian’s father worked long hours in a high profile and demanding job. At home after work, he flopped down in front of the TV and tended to be grumpy and critical when interacting with his family.

Christian was talented at sport but his father took no interest, never coming to see a game. As is often the case with absent fathers, Christian craved his father’s attention, relentlessly seeking to impress him and gain his approval.  

Even though his striving never worked, Christian continued trying to be perfect. He desperately needed to be acknowledged by his boss, colleagues and friends but even when he received a compliment or thanks, he remained unsatisfied.  

During his regression, he learned his perfectionism arose from his feelings of worthlessness and his compulsion to please. He was his own worst enemy. He never praised himself, doubting the quality of his work and being constantly self-critical.

In previous lives, he had been careless and flippant. His current life plan was to make a shift to being more diligent. His absent father was a catalyst. By withholding fatherly attention and acknowledgement from his son, Christian developed his perfectionism. On the continuum of being very easy going at one end and very precise at the other, Christian had shifted significantly. He was now rigidly precise, causing a lot of frustration for himself when he didn’t quite measure up.

Once Christian saw the larger plan for his development, he relaxed. He was on track with his life plan. His negatively reduced and he began acknowledging the progress he was making. He realized there were tasks where being precise was important and others where it wasn’t necessary. Having his perfectionistic tendencies, he easily found the motivation to apply this new knowledge.

Once he felt positive about himself and his work, he stopped needing as much positive attention from his boss and colleagues. He was more relaxed at work and started enjoying his work environment.

Anna

Anna’s father was a quite man. He sat in the corner, reading his books or watching TV. Every now and then he would be annoyed by something his wife did and blow up angrily. He had no interest in his two children.

Even though she disliked her father, Anna married a man who was much the same. She soon discovered that her husband was also distant. He took little interest in their two children. Eventually this became too painful for Anna. She sought counseling and decided to leave the marriage.

Anna’s father never changed. After her marriage broke up, she went back to live with her parents for a few months. Her father kept to himself and ignored his grandchildren.

After her son was diagnosed with autism, Anna realized that both her father and her husband had autistic tendencies. The marriage had survived for as long as it did only because she played the same role as a wife as she had as a child. She tiptoed around her father and she had tiptoed around her husband.

She did a life between lives regression because she wondered what she was supposed to learn from these relationships.

Anna’s guides reassured her that she was on track. She was on the path of learning how to balance her needs with the needs of others. This is a very difficult lesson to learn. Some people give so much of themselves they become ill. Others are selfish and ignore the needs of others. No matter which side of this continuum, you are on, the consequences of being out of balance are unpleasant.

Anna’s husband and father are also in the process of learning this lesson.  Her husband was not happy about her leaving. He had to fend for himself. He might have many challenging lifetimes before he understands the importance of caring for others.

When Anna left her husband, she was emotionally drained and feeling lost. She didn’t know who she was and what she really needed. She had given too much of herself away.

Now she is tasked with solving this dilemma. Bringing up an autistic son is challenging, especially since she knows she need to balance looking after him with looking after herself.

Knowing this is a difficult journey is helpful. We all learn through experience. This means trial and error. Being kind to herself is crucially important whenever she finds the balance getting out of kilter. But she knows she is on the right path and this is a comfort.

Absent fathers have their role in our soul development. Those people who have had absent fathers often envy their friends with attentive fathers. Although that is understandable, if you had an absent father, it is worthwhile meditating on the gifts the absence of your father may have given you.

One client met his father during his life between lives. He complained.

“Why didn’t you ever do anything with me when I was young?”

“Don’t you remember son,” his father replied. “You asked me to step back when we first made the plan for your life. You wanted to build your independence.”

The focus of our two sessions had been on his need to develop independence. The client knew immediately his father was right. All the past hurt drained away.

By taking a high perspective of your soul’s journey through many lifetimes might reveal that your absent father is, in fact, a blessing.

Absent Fathers (Part 1)

Absent Fathers (Part 1)

Fathers who are emotionally absent leave a legacy to their children. Their children usually grow up feeling incomplete, empty or lost in some way. Although many of us disapprove of this legacy, we discover during life between lives regressions that this “father absence” has a purpose.

“My father was absent even when he was present,” mused my client, Lara, as we explored her childhood. Her father read the paper in the morning, rarely acknowledging his three children. He sat at the head of the table at dinner, watching the news on TV. The only time he engaged with Lara was when she had done something that he considered incorrect. Even this critical attention was rare.

Adult children of absent fathers use different strategies to deal with the emptiness they carry.

Desperate for her father’s love and attention, Lara spent her childhood being ‘the good girl, hoping to get a few crumbs of positive attention. It didn’t work, her father had his mind on other things, mainly his work, fulfilling what he believed was his male role—providing for his family.

In her teens, Lara gave up being the good girl and rebelled. She decided her father wasn’t important. In fact, her behavior was largely a reaction to him. Subconsciously, she was trying to get his attention and punish him by being the bad girl.

Lara struggled with her relationships with men. She didn’t know how to relax and be herself. She didn’t know how to express her true feelings. She was always afraid her partners would leave, and they did.

She was attracted to men who were like her father, expecting them to treat her the same way as her father did. And they did. No matter how much she tried to get her partners to love her, they remained distant.

Of course, there was a part of her that would have been terrified if her partner suddenly become loving and attentive. She had no model for dealing with that level of intimacy.

When we did a regression, she realized she was still living with her ‘internalized father.’  She was guided to look more deeply at her father and his history. She saw that his father, her paternal grandfather, was also distant, never emotionally connecting with his children. Times were tough, back then. There were wars and danger. Nearly everyone shut off their emotions and focused on surviving. The father absence had come down the ancestral line.

Lara’s guides told her she could change her relationships with men and attract a different type of man. First, she had to heal her relationship with her father.

She was given an image of her father as a child. He was alone, afraid and confused. She knew what this felt like and she started weeping. She wrapped this little boy up in a blanket of love, crying many tears, not knowing if the tears were hers or her fathers.

After this session, her relationship with her father changed. She didn’t see him as the cold rejecting father anymore. She saw him as the hurt child. She was gentle with him and just a little affectionate. He softened and sometimes asked about her life.

Her guides told Lara that she was here to learn to be loving rather than judging. She had been hurt by her father’s absence, believing it was about her, thinking she was unlovable. In truth, it was not about her at all. Her father was emotionally shut down. His heart had hardened to survive and when Lara was acting out the bad girl, her heart had hardened too.

Lara realized that there is always a reason for people being cool and distant. Sometimes, by asking our guides to help us see the truth, we are given a glimpse of their pain and suffering. Seeing the truth of people, their inner pain, fear and isolation, can lift us out of judgement. Then, as loving souls, we are inclined to treat them carefully, with kindness and compassion.

 

In part 2 of Absent Fathers, we explore two more illuminating cases.

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