A Transpersonal Journey

A Transpersonal Journey

A transpersonal journey is different to a past life or life between lives regression in one significant way. Our focus in a transpersonal journey is on resolving the problems of the client and we do that by a process of investigation. The client needs to be ready and willing to face these issues and delve deep. We often utilise the emotions associated with the issue to gather relevant information.

The session involves the client’s guides who we call in and ask for help. The journey may involve a past life, a current life or even a visit to the life between lives, especially that area where spirits become stuck. At the beginning, we never know where we may go. We simply trust the shift will take place. To achieve the desired outcome the client needs to be open to exploring whatever situation is presented by the guides.

Even though every session is unique, here is a case which may give you a sense of a transpersonal journey. Paul came to see me in the hope he could sort out some issues.

Paul described having a pattern of depression which came upon him at least once a year. During the months before the day of his booked appointment with me, he had another of these debilitating episodes. He was so tired and anxious he lost fifteen kilograms. Fortunately, he had weened himself off his anti-depressants earlier in the year and was sufficiently aware during this period to clearly describe what had happened.

Paul was very busy in his self-employed business but one weekend took time off to engage in several physical activities. He did a three hour session of martial arts and a couple of hours of surfing. When he got home, he had some household activities to do before tackling the work he had to complete in his office. As he walked into his office, he realised how exhausted he was. He describes how he felt.

I knew I had overdone it and I started feeling anxious. When I feel like that it is a case of the damage has been done but, at the time, I felt overwhelmed.

As Paul described this memory, he accessed the same feelings he had at the time. You might notice how he changed tense.

Fearful energy comes up my spine and I go into flight or fight. I have tremors in the body, palpitations, short breaths, tense stomach. It feels like total dread.

I use these emotions to help us explore, so I ask him if he has felt like this before. He describes some earlier episodes in his current life before further detailing his cycle of distress.

The anxiety creates flight or fight. I can’t sleep and can’t eat. When all of that happens, there are senses in my head which make me feel disconnected because my thoughts are foggy. I have obtrusive thoughts.

I ask Paul to tell me the nature of these intrusive thoughts.

I remember the first time that I had this cycle. I couldn’t switch it off. I was in a stressful job and we had a new baby. I’d stopped taking antidepressants. I had a few anxiety attacks and I couldn’t work. When I was going through a burst of anxiety, I walked around the block trying to calm myself. I forced myself to eat dinner. I was light sensitive so the lights had to be turned down. We decided to watch something and we chose a dark psychological movie. I sat through it. The main character is investigating a disappearance on an island asylum. Near the end, (crying) he discovers the most dangerous patient is himself. He is a murderer.

We went to bed and I was laying there. I had fears of going crazy, that I might wake up in the morning suddenly discovering I am bad, like the psychopath.

Paul is terribly upset while relating this memory. He has the same symptoms as before. I wonder if this could be triggering some sort of past life with remnants bleeding into his current life.

I was scared as a little kid. Before I married, I was very self-destructive. Since having kids, the feeling of love for them is overwhelming. I am over-protective and afraid for them. I want them to grow up and know they are okay. But I want to enjoy them when they are little. It is a catch 22. I cannot enjoy my children because I am so afraid of something happening to them. I can’t watch TV. If I get something that triggers me, like a movie, I feel terrible dread. Then I think, I have gone too far!  

I suggest that this sense of “I have gone too far” is a trigger. Paul replies that he felt like that at the beginning of the recent weekend episode when he had done too much in one day.

I ask if we can keep exploring this sense of going too far.

Paul: I want to do it. I am just scared of being stuck in it and cannot get out.

Karen: Stuck in what way.

Paul: I see a dark tunnel and light at the end.

Karen: Focus on that.

Paul: I am really claustrophobic. 

Karen: What would you like to do? Unlock the claustrophobia or something else?

Paul: I’d like to meet my guide.

I know Paul is currently feeling afraid and stuck. To meet his guide, he will need to access a higher frequency.

Karen: Okay. First, we need to go to a safe, happy place. What is that for you?

Paul: Rainforest with a stream.

I give him a guided meditation of a rainforest and stream, and eventually ask what he is aware of.

Paul: Dark. My heartrate is fast.

Karen: What is that heart rate telling you about yourself at the moment? (long silence) What’s happening now?

 Paul: I feel like I am really deep and dark.

Karen: Is that a relaxed feeling?

Paul: Hmm, body really heavy.

Karen: Stay with that, perhaps that is what your body needs at the moment. (Long silence). Anything coming, Paul?

Paul: Lots of coloured lights in the darkness.

Karen: Could be healing lights. Anything you want to share you can. Otherwise I’ll just let you be for a while. (Another long silence).

Paul: What is my purpose?

Ask you guides and see what pops in.

Paul: Love.

Paul: How do I heal? Light

Karen: How would the light heal you?

Paul: Togetherness.

Karen: What does that mean?

Paul: Family. wisdom, chakra, twelve, heal. It is different now, a real tunnel feeling. I am moving. Bright lights are around me and they are shrinking almost like I am going backwards.

Karen: Go with that. That could be healing too.

Paul: I see a rat’s face.

Karen: What does that mean?

Paul: Time.

What is important about time in this context?

Paul: Time is everything.

K: What do you think about the tunnel and light at the end going backward?

Paul: Not sure.

Karen: Do you remember your fear of going too far and not being able to go back?

Paul: Yes.

Karen: I think the guides just showed you that you can.

Paul smiles.

Karen: Thinking about what we have done today, how do you feel.

Paul: It makes me happy. I am going to focus on self-love as that always makes me feel better. I think that I need to trust my intuition and meditate more. I am genuinely a good person. I know that. I deserve self-love.

Now I take Paul back to the weekend which started two months of anxiety and serious weight loss, including feelings of dread, fast heartrate and tremors earlier in the session. Now he reports feeling nothing. I also take him back to the disturbing movie which had caused him considerable distress. Again, his feelings are neutral.

He had lost all negative emotional charge, which had been previously associated with the scenarios.

You might wonder what happened to gain such a shift in Paul’s attitude as not a lot was said in the last half of the regression. However, there were a lot of long pauses during this time. Paul had calmed himself down and it is quite likely that the guides were working on him energetically while he was seeing all the coloured lights.

Paul left feeling light and happy. He had committed to asking the guides for help in the future, and he assured me he would return if he had any sense of going back into the old pattern of deep anxiety and fatigue.

This sort of session is called a transpersonal journey because it is set up to harness the wisdom of our spirit guides. The guides respect free will. They do not interfere in our human journey. To receive help, we need to ask as specifically as we can.

Before we embark on the transpersonal journey, we explore the client’s issues to gain clarity on the key problem. We call in the guides and ask them to keep out any unwanted energies so only those wise beings are present who are here for the highest good of the client and highest good of all. We do that so we can trust the journey and what is received.

Usually we start exploring the issue without any hypnotic induction but sometimes an induction is necessary to calm the client. If any blocks are present, our first task is to explore and dismantle those. Some clients have something on their mind. When so, it needs to be put to rest. Bringing it to the surface is the most effective way to do that.

Then we embark on the journey trusting we are receiving help from the guides. Sometimes information flows, coming to the client with no help from me. Other times I help the client surface information by asking questions.

I have found the transpersonal journey is a useful way of addressing issues that are holding clients back from progressing in the way they would like.

Feeling Disturbed?

Feeling Disturbed?

Have you ever noticed that sometimes something you see, hear about or read disturbs you and stays in you mind? There is a reason for this and it is worth exploring its source in order to gain a deeper self-understanding and peace.

This blog is accessed via a link. It is one I have written as a guest blog for my colleague, Lisbeth Lysdale.

NOTE: the english translation is below the Danish script.

Click here to read more.

 

 

Panic attacks with an unusual cause.

Panic attacks with an unusual cause.

When I was working as a psychologist, I saw an average of twenty clients a week. Over twenty years, I must have seen thousands of clients. Even so, some stories have stayed with me. Here is one about a client suffering panic attacks.

Chrissy, aged 28, came to see me because she felt increasingly anxious. She had always been a bit anxious, but it had never stopped her from getting on with her life. I considered this a normal level of anxiety. But over the last twelve months, her anxiety had developed into panic attacks.

Her father had committed suicide six years earlier. He’d been an unhappy, sensitive man who coped by using alcohol. Before this, he’d been a loving father to her. She said she coped with his suicide by believing he was at peace. She’d hated watching his emotional turmoil over the last couple of years before he died. Her mother had left him, and he never quite recovered from this experience of loss and rejection.

Like most people, she felt like she was dying during her panic attacks. Somehow, each time they hit, she managed to pull herself out of the fear and regain her composure. This wasn’t a satisfactory solution because, sooner or later, they always returned.

I use the technique of supported exposure to deal with panic attacks. I consider panic attacks to be a type of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Some specific experience, perhaps too fleeting to be noticed, brings a past trauma suddenly and vividly to life.

Supported exposure gently takes the client back into the experience of panic, while letting her know she is safe and supported. Usually the client receives more information about the trauma by staying with the feelings of panic until they gradually subside.

I asked Chrissy to describe her panic attack and, within a few moments, she was back in it. I encouraged her to be brave and stay with her feelings, breathing slowly and deeply. She followed my instructions and soon started reporting her impressions.

She sensed the presence of her father. I accepted this as her truth and began to explore it. I asked if he knew he was dead. She felt a strong sense of confusion and fear.

I have many clients who have sensed the presence of the dead, especially those they had loved who have passed on. Their presence often stirs up feelings of confusion. I used the same technique with Chrissy as I had used with them, as it had always worked.

I suggested she tell her father he has died. He committed suicide many years ago thinking that would free him from pain, but the pain remains. This may sound counter-intuitive, especially if you believe death to be the end. But even though our body falls away, our soul-self continues. Chrissy’s father is clutching onto her because he does not know what else to do.

I explained this to her. “You love him, but his pain is too great for you to bear. It is time for him to go. Are you willing to let him go, Chrissy?”

Chrissy started crying. She admitted it was difficult to let him go. Since his death, she had been aware of his presence from time to time, especially if she felt down or alone. This had been a comfort to her.

I explained it was time to release him. He had things to do on the other side and she needed to learn how to cope without him. I continued to reassure her, giving her time to weep quietly until she decided to let him go.

She suddenly saw a bright light, even though her eyes were closed. Then she said, “He’s gone.” She reported feeling calm.

As she opened her eyes, she explained that she now understood what had happened. He had attached to her after he died. She had never completely grieved her loss because she had never fully felt he’d gone. She wondered if he had sensed some need in her and hung around to help her cope.

It wasn’t only her father who’d felt lost. She had too. After five years with her, he wanted to leave, but every time he started to let go, she went into a panic. This took her back to the moment she learned of his suicide and all her feelings of helplessness. Now she realised she’d been hanging onto him, holding him back from getting on with his life on the other side. The tears she shed during the session expressed the loss she was finally feeling.

After this session, Chrissy had no more panic attacks and her anxiety subsided. She came to see me several times, building her inner strength and developing the confidence to cope as an adult in the world. As well, she soon felt connected to her spiritual guide who was there to help her.

Chrissy was one of the early clients I encountered who was hanging onto a deceased loved one. I have met many more since, on my journey as a healer, some when I was a psychologist and some as a spiritual practitioner. Not all involve panic attacks. There can be other symptoms, such as depression, sadness or feelings of helplessness. Some people know they are hanging onto a loved one but don’t know how to let go. Others, like Chrissy, don’t want to let go.

Panic attacks have many causes. They are all discoverable if the practitioner and the client are willing to explore deeply with an expansive view of what is possible.

 

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